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Melissa Thomasson is looking forward to leading new initiatives as the first female chair of the economics department.
NEWS

Miami appoints first female economics chair 

Before making history here, Thomasson began her career at a small liberal arts college in Tacoma, Washington, called the University of Puget Sound. There, she remembers being one of two women in classes of only seven students.  “Everyone talked about that picture of Nancy Pelosi in the cabinet where she’s the only woman, and I think I know what that feels like,” Thomasson said.  “I’ve gotten used to it,” she added.  


Fraternity potential new members say they aren't concerned about hazing.
NEWS

Fraternities take new steps to move past Delts hazing and build trust

“We can't just sit in an office and make rules,” Vance said. “We've got to provide education and hear the voices of the students, the alumni, the various stakeholders in the community, and bring people together around common ideals. [We have to] help people focus on the fact that we’re values-based organizations, and what is it that we really value?”


NEWS

The long road to sustainability at Miami

Adam Sizemore sits in the dark. Down a narrow hallway of the Physical Facilities Department, behind a heavy door wired to a buzzing lock — one that can only be opened when an administrative assistant is at the window — Miami University’s Sustainability Director leans back in his office chair. The low afternoon sunlight comes through the blinds, dusting pieces of the room, the rest in comfortable shadow. “I figure, why waste electricity, right?” he said. 


When Perry Gordon found out about the recent 39 layoffs, he was reminded of his own painful layoff experience.
NEWS

‘It gets better after 10 years:’ Former Miami employee recounts his 2010 layoff

When he got the call, Perry Gordon was walking down Oak Street, braving the cold winter weather to write parking tickets on Miami University's campus. This wasn’t typically part of his job as the director of parking and transportation services, a position he had held since September 2007.  That day, though — Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 — was a slow one.  “You need to get to HR,” his wife, Kate Stoss, said, on the other end of the line.  “You need to get to Roudebush right away.” 


NEWS

Impeachment — then vs. now

Miami University’s political climate has changed quite a bit over the past 20 years and, in turn, so has the way students discuss major current events, such as impeachment.


Paws for a Cause members try to educate people on the correct way to act around service dogs.
NEWS

‘Can I pet your dog?’: A look into service animal training on campus

A black German retriever trots up the steps of McGuffey Hall, gathering stares from other students sharing the path. Although most either ignore or smile at the dog, one student shrinks into a corner and turns their head away from her path — afraid. Two others rush to the next corner, embracing each other as one begins to cry.


NEWS

How social media has changed the way we view death

Through videos, tweets, photos and boomerangs, social media is used to showcase the best side of life. We scroll through our feeds to see the faces of friends, family and celebrities accompanied by loving or witty captions. But after someone dies, their social media accounts immediately become time capsules.


Image from https://twitter.com/mikedewine.
NEWS

Mike DeWine named 2020 commencement speaker

DeWine is a career politician, having served as a U.S. senator from 1995-2007 and Ohio attorney general from 2011-2019. He has also held roles as lieutenant governor of Ohio and U.S. Representative. He earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Miami and has periodically returned to the university to teach government courses. DeWine’s wife, four of his children and four of his grandchildren also attended or are currently attending the university.


NEWS

Oxford stores out of masks, disinfectants

Cold medicine, bandages and cremes line the shelves in the pharmacy section of Walmart, but one row remains empty. Where the masks usually reside sits a taped sign: “We do not have any face masks. Sorry for the inconvenience!” An identical bright orange message is posted on the pharmacy window. 


NEWS

A ‘thousand miles away’: International students react to the virus infecting their hometown

As Shaoyang Zhou walked through Armstrong Student Center to class last Tuesday, he knew people were watching him. Some stopped and stared, but this was exactly the reaction he was hoping for.  Zhou purchased a hazmat suit, and on Tuesday, Jan. 28, he decided to wear it around campus to raise awareness for the 2019 novel coronavirus itself and the devastating impact it has had in his community in Wuhan. 


NEWS

Myaamia Center sees change in leadership

Though neither woman was born into the tribe, Burke and Powell were instrumental in growing the presence of Myaamia students at the university and in instituting the Myaamia Project in 2001, which would become the Myaamia Center twelve years later.


NEWS

Suspended professor reinstated

Following hearings that took place throughout the fall of 2019, Gladish signed a resolution agreement to cease termination procedures against him and return to his position as a professor of biology and biological sciences on Wednesday, Jan. 29. This includes the reinstatement of his tenure, Miami’s AAUP chapter president, Cathy Wagner, said. 


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