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Culture


The Gathering at the Poet’s Shack

On the evening of Nov. 16, Bishop Woods and Upham Hall were lit with the spirit of creativity — and an impressive number of lights and projectors — for a celebration of art and collaboration across a multitude of departments at Miami.


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CULTURE

Finals mark the fall finish line

For college students, the end of November is marked by turkey of varying quality, plates brimming with stuffing, the first taste of holiday tunes, late nights huddled over textbooks and cramming for fall finals. 


At Thanksgiving, the dinner table can easily become a battlefield. But by keeping a few things in mind, it doesn't have to.
FOOD

A tumultuous turkey day: surviving Thanksgiving 2020

Ah, Thanksgiving. A holiday known for family gatherings and decadent food. As the warmth of countless ovens pervade an equal number of houses, the rich smells of holiday feasts come wafting with it. The tables are set for lavish dinners, and the spirit of thanks and generosity abounds. 


For Wild Berry, the business model of making incense has made sense since 1971.
CULTURE

Wild Berry: fifty years on High Street

  Upon entering Wild Berry, a local retail shop uptown, customers are overcome by the smell of incense and the store’s eclectic nature. Each wall is lined with different trinkets, gifts and accessories, and the store’s floors are crowded with racks of imported clothing and towers of incense.  Although the store has been open for decades, general manager Kimberly Clarke says Wild Berry has always sold the same type of products and has successfully maintained their brand as a “hippie” shop throughout the past 50 years.


Miami's a cappella groups have always faced the challenge of singing without musical backing, but now they have to sing without an audience, too.
CULTURE

A new avenue for a cappella

Singing a cappella presents unique challenges to those who decide to pursue it. They must sing without any musical accompaniment, substituting their voices for instruments, everyone singing a different part.  On top of this, a cappella groups now face the challenge of not being allowed to hold any performances or practices in person due to COVID-19. 


CULTURE

“Small enough to jail” panel discusses ethics, injustice

  On Nov. 5, the Farmer School of Business finished up its Executive Speaker series, which normally features executives of large corporations that serve as role models for the future business leaders of America.  The last installment in the series brought a different kind of speaker — four of them, actually, all associated with a small bank that was targeted during the 2008 financial crisis.


For Miami's Theatre Department, the show must go on, even in spite of COVID restrictions. Photo provided by Jamie Chmielewski.
CULTURE

The show must go on: Theatre department overcoming COVID-19 obstacles

  Production season finally rolled around, stage lights were turned on and rehearsals for the next masterpiece had begun.  But then, COVID-19 struck and disrupted the entirety of the plan. According to the state guidelines, audiences have not been allowed to attend shows since last spring. But as the theatre saying goes, the show must go on. 


While skipping class is usually frowned upon, some professors are giving students the okay to miss class in order to vote. Graphic by Owen Berg.
CULTURE

Excusing class for Election Day can ease stress for students

  For some students, the upcoming election is the first opportunity they will have to vote, but busy class schedules can make performing this civic duty difficult.  Some professors are willing to rearrange their class schedules in order to benefit students. Whether that’s a movie day with an excused absence or canceling class altogether, some professors are willing to provide options for students so they can exercise their right to vote. 


Although some chose to spend the holiday at home, many Miamians still took to Oxford's streets to celebrate Halloween. Photo by Shr-Hua Moore.
CULTURE

Oxford celebrates Halloween: a narrative

  Halloween is many things — tricks, treats, parties and costumes — but music is also an essential part of the holiday. As I experienced Halloween in Oxford this year, Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Toccata and Fugue in D minor” is one example that was on my mind. It’s a famous 18th century piece that has been used prominently in early horror films and shows how music can sound dark and foreboding even when it was composed hundreds of years ago. It’s composed of three movements: a toccata, a fugue and a coda.  In the spirit of Halloween and in keeping with Bach’s spooky season staple, here’s the story of a 2020 Halloween in Oxford, as told in three parts.


While the way Oxford celebrates Halloween has evolved over time, the spooky spirit has endured. Photo by Madeline Phaby.
CULTURE

From masquerades to parades: The history of Halloween in Oxford

  This year, due to COVID-19, Oxford residents will be forced to forego some of their Halloween traditions. These traditions mainly include costume parties for adults and trick-or-treating for kids — which will still happen, just in a socially-distanced fashion. But Oxford has celebrated Halloween in a variety of different ways over the years — some spookier than others.


CULTURE

Carving out a slice of normalcy

Throughout the streets of Oxford, pumpkins still adorn the porches of house after house, just like they have every year in October. From intricately-carved masterpieces to the tried and true Jack-o’-lantern face, their designs evoke a feeling of fall festivity and spooky splendor. 


After seven months in quarantine, Miami students are finding their way back into the dating game.
CULTURE

Swiping right during COVID-19

During the COVID-19 pandemic, online dating sites such as Tinder and Bumble have surged in popularity. According to The Observer, days after the initial stay-at-home orders were implemented in the United States, Tinder had its highest day of activity with more than three billion swipes on March 29. d

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