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Entertainment


ENTERTAINMENT

Fall TV: The good, the bad and 'Young Sheldon'

The arrival of September means the unfortunate combination of two phenomena: the beginning of classes and onslaught of fall television. It's difficult to find time to study for midterms or write that poly sci essay when there are so many new compelling programs vying for network approval. The fall schedule can be complicated to navigate, so no matter how you're trying to procrastinate, whether you're looking for an HBO megadrama or a silly late night comedy to binge through, a new hit or an old favorite, we've got you covered.


ENTERTAINMENT

'Leap!' goes from 'Swan Lake' to swan dive

Just about everything you might expect to be annoying about an animated, 19th-century film about dueling Parisian child ballerinas cripples "Leap!" It's essentially a Barbie movie with twice the budget, worse characters and even less plausibility (but better pop songs.)


ENTERTAINMENT

'Game of Thrones' makes a mad dash for the endzone

Television, which was once condensed to weekly programs on three or four channels, has expanded so vastly in recent years that it's impossible for a person to watch every show of note. In such a diluted market, the TV series-as-a-cultural-event, where, for the course of an hour, a large swath of viewers has their eyes on the same program, has essentially died.


ENTERTAINMENT

"DAMN." another dense masterpiece from Kendrick Lamar

There's no way to unpack a Kendrick Lamar LP in one listen. From his major breakthrough "good kid, m.A.A.d city," presented as a time-jumping short film, to his ambitious, eclectic follow-up "To Pimp a Butterfly" which garnered 11 Grammy nominations -- one short of Michael Jackson's record for "Thriller" -- a Lamar record is guaranteed to come loaded with multi-narrative character arcs, history-spanning musical cues and some of the most stunning vocal acrobatics in hip-hop. Even last year's comparably small TPAB companion piece "untitled unmastered." was among the best rap releases of the year.


CULTURE

'The Wild Party' captures the spirit of the 20s

For fans of rebellion, sexual liberation and general debauchery (basically the 1920s as an era), the Miami University Department of Theatre's production of "The Wild Party" is a thought-provoking feast for the senses that should not be missed.


CULTURE

Dance Theatre performs spring concert

As the bright, swirling Technicolor background lit up Hall Auditorium, the audience was instantly pulled in. Dancers in long, medieval gowns began to twirl from behind the curtains until they were interrupted by a young man in full 1970s hippie garb, carrying a boombox playing "Stayin' Alive"


OPINION

'13 Reasons Why' handles suicide irresponsibly

The trailer for "13 Reasons Why" seemed preposterous, and I'm a staunch proponent of young adult-targeted TV campiness; "Bunheads" and "Make It or Break it" rank among my favorite shows, and full disclosure, I still record "Teen Mom 2" to binge over breaks.


ENTERTAINMENT

Chance the Philanthropist

When Chance the Rapper dropped "Coloring Book" almost a year ago, I was nearing the end of high school, and my best friends and I were driving early one morning before school to watch the sunrise on Lake Michigan. I immediately fell in love with the catchy hooks, goofy laughs and nonsensical yelps that filter through his lyrics.


ENTERTAINMENT

'Legion' is an excellent, trippy take on superhero TV

In the past few years, superheroes have taken television by storm. The CW has a DC show for almost every day of the week, and Marvel has partnered with ABC and Netflix to broadcast a handful of popular shows like "Daredevil" and "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." Just when it seemed like the formula for a comic book show was obvious, FX's "Legion" arrived to turn everything on its head.


CULTURE

IAS production masquerades as real talk show

Miami students may have noticed posters hanging around campus advertising the arrival of "The Latest Show," a talk show stopping in Oxford as part of its College Tour. Those who attended the showings, however, realized that this was not an actual filming of a real talk show, but a play made to appear like one.