Established 1826 — Oldest College Newspaper West of the Alleghenies

Shr-Hua Moore



Miami students and alumni see the spike in hate crimes as a symptom of a media that doesn’t meaningfully address anti-Asian racism and its significance in American society. Graphic by Kayla Lynskey.

Students question media coverage of anti-Asian racism

  This February, as both Asian and Asian American Miami University students enjoyed the Lunar New Year, a nationwide spike in hate crimes against the Asian community dampened the celebration. Both the Oxford Police Department (OPD) and Miami University Police Department (MUPD) have not received any official reports of hate crimes against Asian or Asian American people over the past year. However, Miami’s Asian and Asian American students are disheartened by the anti-Asian racism in the United States, as well as the media’s lack of coverage of these events.





COVID-19 has drastically changed the job market making it increasingly difficult for recent grads to find employment amid a pandemic.

Post grad in a pandemic: Students struggle to find a future after college

For most university students, the start of the spring semester signals the beginning of classes and a fresh start both academically and mentally. However, for many college seniors, it puts the end of the school year into an all-too-clear focus. The question of employment and education after college becomes more pressing every day.  



“Small enough to jail” panel discusses ethics, injustice

  On Nov. 5, the Farmer School of Business finished up its Executive Speaker series, which normally features executives of large corporations that serve as role models for the future business leaders of America.  The last installment in the series brought a different kind of speaker — four of them, actually, all associated with a small bank that was targeted during the 2008 financial crisis.


Although some chose to spend the holiday at home, many Miamians still took to Oxford's streets to celebrate Halloween. Photo by Shr-Hua Moore.

Oxford celebrates Halloween: a narrative

  Halloween is many things — tricks, treats, parties and costumes — but music is also an essential part of the holiday. As I experienced Halloween in Oxford this year, Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Toccata and Fugue in D minor” is one example that was on my mind. It’s a famous 18th century piece that has been used prominently in early horror films and shows how music can sound dark and foreboding even when it was composed hundreds of years ago. It’s composed of three movements: a toccata, a fugue and a coda.  In the spirit of Halloween and in keeping with Bach’s spooky season staple, here’s the story of a 2020 Halloween in Oxford, as told in three parts.


Students looking for an unorthodox snack need look no further than the packed shelves of the Asia Market.

Hidden gems of Oxford: the Asia Market

What exactly does the Asia Market have to offer that sets it apart from Kroger or Wal-mart? To find out, I ventured past the boundaries of the university’s campus and took a look around the market.