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Culture


CULTURE

When we all fall asleep, where does the ranch dressing go?

The display case offers a wide array of options: French, Italian, Caesar, balsamic and even raspberry vinaigrette. There is one particular dressing, however, that appears to be missing.  At first glance, it feels like a mistake. Perhaps you simply glanced too quickly. Perhaps it’s stuck behind the raspberry vinaigrette packets. But no, as sad as it is to accept, the ranch packets seem to have disappeared from Lux — and this is where our Midwestern mystery begins. 


CULTURE

For 10 points: who are the hosts of Top Deck Trivia?

  On the first Wednesday of the spring semester, the line to get into Top Deck extended all the way down the stairs.   Inside, the bar was buzzing with people carrying pitchers of beer to their tables and teams trying to find a space to sit — or at this point, stand.  Ben Storsved, who graduated in December, and junior Hunter Wotruba stood in the back corner of the bar, behind a laptop and sound system and under a glowing Chicago Cubs logo sign — one of many neon signs decorating Top Deck’s walls.  As the clock strikes 10 p.m., Ben leans in and speaks warmly into a microphone.  “Hello friends and welcome back to another fantastic week at Top Deck Trivia!”


MAGAZINE

Oxford Magazine hosts Spring Street Reading

The rain drizzling outside the windows harmonizes with the first few notes of “Piano Man” a student plunks out on the old piano at the front of the room. As another student draws the words “Spring Street Reading '' in bubble letters on a large whiteboard, students and English professors trickle in slowly, helping themselves to the coffee, lemonade and cookies laid out on the back table and settle in to hear their fellow students’ stories.


CULTURE

Notes of Nostalgia

High school dances may be a cesspool of sweat and hooligans, but one dance I went to will always hold a special place in my heart.  When I was a sophomore in high school, my school held a masquerade-themed Winter Formal. Traditionally, it was a girls-ask-guys dance, but I went with a few of my friends. 


Spring Street Treats caters to human and canine customers, offering ice cream, dog treats and more.
CULTURE

Meet, greet and eat at Spring Street Treats

 Across the titular street from the Oxford Fire Department, the lime-green ice cream shop used to be home to a drive-through bank, but now features bright colored walls, shelves full of knick-knacks for sale and quite a few customers who stop by regularly for pints to bring home.  


This Miami duo brings a mix of musical stylings to the basement stage of 1868.
CULTURE

Sharing the stage leads two Miami students to find their own paths

On Tuesday nights, two very different styles of music can be heard emanating from a basement bar on High Street.  Nestled underground on West High Street is Bar 1868, a laid-back lounge with an atmosphere that makes Brick Street’s bustling dance floor seem all the more hectic. The bar has pool tables, biweekly drag shows and, every Tuesday night, live music performed by Miami University seniors Karen Mayet and Zach Vanderink. 


CULTURE

Notes of nostalgia: ode to a foggy first day of classes

Aug. 29, 2016 was my fifth day on Miami’s campus after I’d first set foot on the red bricks and moved into Thomson Hall. My phone lit up, abuzz with my alarm at 7:00 a.m. I’d been using a “sleep clock” app that a Buzzfeed listicle called a “college essential.” I’d read an array of similar posts to help me develop some sense of preparation for my first-ever undergraduate courses. The alarm ended up being helpful – it woke me up at seemingly the perfect time.


Art 160 puts a new spin on the traditional art class.
CULTURE

Miami students kiln it in the art department

The pottery wheels hum softly as nine students bend over their work, hands gently wrapped around the spinning cups and bowls. Bright sunlight blazes in from the almost-full-length windows spread across two walls of the room, illuminating the space and the students’ faces.


CULTURE

Rebecca Andres: A strong, independent woodwind

Spending her childhood forging her musical talents, Rebecca Andres eventually found herself playing for Cincinnati Broadway Across America’s "Wicked." In the 96 performances that followed, Andres further fine-tuned her flute skills. Andres found her passion for music in the fourth grade. She comes from a family of musicians — many of her relatives play piano and her sister plays the violin. Andres tried to play the violin, too, but found that it wasn’t a good fit. 


FOOD

Muslim Students' Association Decorates and Donates

  As the leaves swirled down from the trees outside of Armstrong on Friday, Nov. 15, Miami’s Muslim Students’ Association (MSA) swirled ornate designs onto the arms of students who stopped at their booth. Adjacent to a card table covered with various canned foods like Campbell’s soup and JIF peanut butter is another table occupied by a student practicing an ancient art form: henna.


Armstrong Pavilion played host to a cross-cultural culinary collaboration to celebrate Chuseok last Saturday.  
CULTURE

Korean Thanksgiving dishes out food, friendship and festivities

Armstrong Pavilion is a large room, but last Saturday it felt small as people of all different backgrounds came together as one to celebrate the Korean holiday “Chuseok.” This holiday, which is typically celebrated in September, is a Korean Thanksgiving, with the purpose being to gather with family and share stories and food. 


CULTURE

Stories in seconds

 Some stories delve deeply into the lives of their subjects. Others seek to capture the human condition in just a few words. Modeled after journalist Brady Dennis’ 300 word stories that explore the unfiltered intimacy of the everyday, these pieces, written by first-year students, offer a glimpse into the untold experiences of college life.  

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